Social Studies Department

The goal of the Social Studies Department is to improve the understanding of social, political, psychological, economic, geographic and cultural realities.  We believe that each student is an individual who should be challenged.  Students are challenged to understand and appreciate his or her rights and responsibilities as a person and as a citizen with the structure of American society.

Department Chairperson: Ms. Carol Luzhak | 732 549 1108 651

World History (500)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 9th, 10th

The World History course explores past civilizations and their impact upon the present. The course surveys Eastern and Western Civilizations and the development of major world religions. The Medieval Period and the dominant role of the Catholic Church are examined. Emphasis is on the transition from Medieval to Modern Europe with special attention on the growth of democracy and nationalism. Knowledge of world geography and the study of other cultures are stressed.

World History Honors (502)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 9th, 10th
Prerequisites: Placement determined by the High School Placement Test

World History Honors surveys major historical themes and cultural patterns of Eastern and Western civilizations. Political, economic and sociocultural aspects of all major world cultures are emphasized in their geographical relationships. Activities develop analytical and critical thinking through readings and research.

Western Civilization I Honors (512)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 9th
Prerequisites: This course is limited to students enrolled in the Honors Program (classical track) as determined by the High School Placement Test

This course is a study of the historical and cultural evolution of Western society from its beginning to the Industrial Revolution. Institutions and ideas are examined not only as social phenomena, but also as expressions of the human encounter with the world. Students are acquainted with basic historical concepts and art works as introduction to Western culture.

United States History I (530)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 10th, 11th

U.S. History I is a study of the development of America from the colonial era to the Gilded Age. Trends in American history including geography, immigration, westward expansion, technological change, the development of political parties and civil rights are studied.

United States History I Honors (532)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 11th
Prerequisites: "B+" average in Western Civilization II, "B+" average in World History Honors, "A" average in World History and department approval

This is a study of the growth of America from the Age of Discov-ery to the Gilded Age. Emphasis is on the relationship of political, economic and social aspects of America's development. Special emphasis is paid to trends, including the growth of democracy, political parties, nationalism, industrialization and imperialism. Constitutional studies, primary documents and geography are included. Analytical and critical thinking are applied through essays and other projects.

United States History II (540)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 11th, 12th
Prerequisite: United States History I

This course traces the development of the United States from the Age of Imperialism to the present. Emphasis is on the events of the previous century as a guide to the nation in the 21st century. It is a chronological study of events including social, political, geographic, military and economic concepts. Critical reading, writing and thinking skills are developed through the study of primary and secondary sources.

United States History II Honors (542)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 12th
Prerequisites: "B+" average in United States History I Honors or "A" average in United States History I and/or department approval

This course focuses on the U.S. from the Age of Imperialism to the present. A chronological study of American History and examina-tion of the political, social, economic, cultural and geographic development of the U.S. is the basis for the course. Students are expected to be able to use their analytical, written and oral skills. Students will be instructed in the process of writing effective essays. Students may optionally take the AP exam.

AP United States History II (545)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 12th
Prerequisites: "A" average in United States History I Honors and/or department approval

This course is taught at the college level with a college level textbook. The course surveys American History from the Age of Imperialism to the present. Areas of study include the political, social, economic, psychological, cultural and geographic development of the U.S. Assessments include essays, research papers and interpretation of primary and secondary source materials. Extensive reading is required; writing, verbal and analytical skills are necessary to succeed. Students are required to take the AP exam.

Psychology (560)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 12th
Prerequisites: "C+" GPA

Psychology is designed to cover material comparable to an introductory college level course. This course is open to those students who have interest in this social science. The course includes a basic survey of all fields of psychology with particular emphasis on personality as well as abnormal, developmental and social psychology.

Economics Honors (Online) (572)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 12th
Prerequisites: "B+" average in previous History courses or teacher recommendation

Economics is the study of how individuals, businesses and governments make decisions about the use of scarce resources. This class will teach students how to think like economists. Students will learn how to apply key microeconomic concepts such as supply and demand, prices and opportunity cost. They will also be introduced to macroeconomic principles such as banking, inflation, unemployment and the Federal Reserve System. The course will also cover a history of economic ideas from the 1700s to modern time.

U.S. Law Honors (582)

Credits: 5
Grade Level: 11th, 12th
Prerequisites: "B" or better in previous History courses or teacher recommendation.

U.S. Law will focus on the structure and history of modern U.S. court proceedings, as well as several works of literature involving court cases. Part of class time will be focused on a project-based learning assignment that culminates in a statewide mock trial competition.